Girls’ Spaces: SBY in Shibuya 109

This is Part Three of a series of posts about dedicated spaces for girls and women in Tokyo, especially created by brands. You can read Part One here and Part Two here.

Shibuya 109, the monolithic epicentre of girls fashion in Japan is packed from top to bottom with the latest trends and fashion dedicated entirely to young women. Aside from the vast array of shops selling clothes, accessories, and beauty products we’ve always noticed an interesting space on the top floor called SBY, an accessories shop which features a cafe and make up corner for young women.

The concept of SBY is to provide a space for young women to not only browse and buy products, but have a semi-private social space to actually use them. As it stands, the main hub for young women to get ready to go out is in locations such as McDonalds where they can camp out at a big table and spend a lot of time without hassle. Providing a more practical space free of charge is an interesting approach for SBY.

As you can see in the image above, there’s a mix of cafe tables as well as large makeup mirrors and tables which can be used freely.

Recently SBY has added additional features. After applying their makeup young women can have their photos taken professionally in a photo booth, and then share them on a public board.

Climbing one’s way through the endless tower of shops that is Shibuya 109 can be exhausting for anyone, so the chance to sit down, relax, and actually use their purchases in a practical environment is welcome, especially for those without big budgets to hang out in cafes. SBY creates a hybrid of a private home atmosphere in a public place, and has a transformative effect on women’s expectations for what a shop should offer beyond products for sale.

This is Part Three of a series of posts about dedicated spaces for girls and women in Tokyo, especially created by brands. You can read Part One here and Part Two here.

About the Author

Jenny is a Mandalah Tokyo intern hailing from NYC and studying in Japan. She speaks native Chinese, Japanese, and proficient Korean and is our resident expert on what's trendy on the Asian continent.