Ecology Art: The Green Island Project at the Media Arts Festival

What would Tokyo look like if the pavement were suddenly replaced with grass? A simple and inviting, yet laughable, prospect but one that the creators of the Green Island project are taking seriously.

green island shibuya

The project is a collaborative effort between creative director Tag (Ryo Taguchi), photo retoucher IMKW (Imakawa), and contemporary artist cum coder Immr (Yuichiro Imamura). The initial result is a series of photographs that cleverly turn Tokyo streets into fields of green. Here is an example of the instantly recognizable Shinjuku.

green island shinjuku

While new development projects in Tokyo are increasingly prioritizing green space (Tokyo Midtown Shopping Complex is an oft-cited example), existing developed space is notoriously grey—something which is taken as matter of fact. The Green Island project aims to encourage the reconsideration of these existing places and remind us of the potential that these already developed areas still offer.

green island harajuku

The Green Island project participated in the recent Japan Media Arts Festival held February 4-15 at the National Art Center Tokyo. The well-attended 12th edition of the annual event included juried entries in the divisions of art, animation, manga, and entertainment. Excellence prizes were picked up by Marcio Ambrosio for “Oups!” (art), Kunio Kato for “The House of Small Cubes” (animation), Makoto Isshiki for “Piano no Mori” (manga), and the Tenori-On development team for the popular Tenori-on game (entertainment).

Trend Potential

Ecology was a major theme at the Media Arts Festival, and has been a growing consumer and production trend in Japan for several years now. For more information on Eco trends in Japan in products, branding, marketing, and behavior, check out our Trendpool innovation database.

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About the Author

Rebecca Milner was a contributor at ShiftEast.com, and is currently a Japan correspondent for Lonely Planet.